Author: BM Koech

Ezekiel Kemboi

Olympic Medals: 2 Gold; 0 Silver; 0 Bronze Ezekiel Kemboi Cheboi is currently Kenya’s most famous athlete, known for his eternal eccentrics, his victory dancing routine and his comradery. Born in Elgeyo-Marakwet County, he came into the limelight after winning the 2001 3,000mS Africa Junior Championships. His personal best of 7:55.76, set in Monaco in 2011, makes him the sixth fastest runner in this discipline of all time. He is a four time World Champion, and the most decorated steeplechase athlete in history. He won gold at the 2004 and 2012 Olympics, running in 8:05.83 and 8:18.56 respectively. He finished 7th in Beijing 2008 and 3rd in Rio 2018, although he was later disqualified from the latter, a few hours after he had announced his...

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David Rudisha

Olympic Medals: 2 Gold; 0 Silver; 0 Bronze David Lekuta Rudisha is one of the world’s greatest ever 800m runners. He currently holds the top three, six of the top ten and ten of the top twenty fastest times over the distance. After winning the World Junior Championship in 2006, the 6”3’ entered athletic folklore on 22 Aug 2010 after he broke the 13 year old 800m world record in 1:41.09, and one week later broke his own record by running a 1:14.01. Rudisha won his first Olympic gold medal in London 2012, breaking his world record again in 1:40.91, the first and only athlete to ever break the 1:41 barrier. Despite a four year period blighted by injury after that, he came back to win his second gold at the 2016 Games in Rio in...

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Introducing Kenya’s Olympic Medallists

Kenya’s Olympic Medallists: 1964 – 2016 is our new book, and as the title implies, is a book about every Kenyan who has ever won an Olympic Medal. In this book, we feature each of the medallists, giving a brief bio of every athlete. By reading it, you learn a little about each of these athletes. We feature every athlete’s date of birth, special event, medal summary and a bio, with specific focus on their Olympic achievement. Kenya is, by far, Africa’s most successful country at the Olympics, winning a total of 100 (31 gold, 38 silver and 31 bronze) medals. Since Kenya’s first participated at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, the country has won at least one medal at the 1964 Olympics, apart from the boycotted games in 1976 and 1980 games in Montreal and Moscow respectively. This book will be available on the Athletics of Kenya Store and on Amazon in soft copy, and within outlets in Nairobi in hard copy. Payment for the book has been made easy. You can purchase it easily using any of the Kenyan mobile payment systems (MPESA, Airtel Money, Yu Money), Paypal, MasterCard or Visa. You can also order and have a copy delivered to you within Nairobi free of charge, and with shipping fees depending on where you are in the world. If you’d like a copy signed by...

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Wario Disbands Olympic Committee

Hassan Wario, the Cabinet Secretary for Sport, has officially disbanded the National Olympic Committee of Kenya. This comes after the NOC was accussed of grossly mismanaging the team that competed at the just-concluded 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Furthermore, the Cabinet Secretary has called for an investigation into the matter, and transferred the duties of the Committee temporarily to the Sports Kenya Management Board. The investigating team is required to present its findings by Sept 30. The athletes at the games were treated very unprofessionally, and there have been various complaints. Among them are the ‘mishap’ that nearly led to javelin silver medallist Julius Yego missing his flight to Rio, mismanagement of paperwork that nearly cost sprinter Calvin Nkanata his place in the team, and the fact that several runners, including reigning 1.500m world champion Asbel Kiprop, had to make personal arrangement to travel to Brazil for the Olympics. This move has been welcomed perhaps most enthusiastically by the Kenya Coaches Association, who felt most aggrieved by the behaviour of the NOCK. Most of them were frozen out of the team that travelled to Rio, and a few that made their way there were not given official recognition when they reported to the Athletics Village, meaning they were unable to access their athletes. The Cabinet Secretary has exonerated himself from any blame, saying his ministry was not directly...

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Five Highs and Five Lows: The Olympic Report, Part II

In Part I of this report, we discussed the good that came out of the previous Olympic games. In Part II, we jump right into The Lows 1. Corruption I have to be honest, from the beginning. It’s very difficult to write about the management of athletics in Kenya without getting a bit emotional. So, if I do get a bit abrasive, I offer no apologies. The truth has got to be said. We treat our athletes, our greatest national heroes and the people who have put us on the global map more than anyone else, like bat droppings. When the Olympic team went to Rio, the level of disorganization was simply staggering. At this point, we are busy pointing fingers at the just disbanded National Olympic Committee, the Ministry of Sports and other bodies, but these are problems that could have been rooted out long before the Olympics came along. Kenya’s track record when it comes to corruption is perhaps as colourful as our record on the running track, and after the saga that nearly led to our disqualification from the Rio 2016 Games for doping, we should have been sufficiently angry. We were not. We let things fester, and the corruption that has infected and festered at the Ministry of Sports, Athletics Kenya and the National Olympic Committee is finally seeping through and dripping it’s smelliness onto...

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